Dangerous new fad: Teens “smoking” alcohol

Parents and health officials around the nation are becoming concerned over the way that many teens and young people are now consuming alcohol. According to reports from substance abuse experts, American adolescents are now actually "smoking" their drinks.

There are multiple YouTube videos that instruct viewers how to pressurize a bottle with beer or wine in the bottom and inhale the alcoholic vapor. By sucking in the alcoholic fumes instead of drinking the liquid, ethanol straight is brought straight into the lungs and the brain causing almost instant intoxication.

"The danger, mainly, is that it leads to rapid intoxication in the sense that you don't know you're getting drunk that fast," said Dr. Robert Glatter, an ER physician, during an interview with local Evanston, Indiana NBC affiliate WFIE. "When people drink, the normal sensation they get more and more drunk is to vomit, it's your body's way of expelling alcohol. However your brain can't expel alcohol. So, it's extremely dangerous." 

This trend has grown quickly because some people mistakenly believe that there are no calories consumed by inhaling alcohol vapor, which would lead to weight loss. A Dallas, Texas man stirred more controversy recently by claiming in an online video that he had lost over 80 pounds by smoking alcohol. In truth, you can still consume calories if you vaporize alcohol. If you can feel the effects of the alcohol, then you are absorbing the calories associated with it.

Alcohol smoking made a brief appearance ten years ago, when alcohol vaporizing machines began to be sold, but the U.S. government quickly banned them. Its growing popularity this time can be attributed to the wider prevalence of instructional videos and websites. There are also many vaporizing products offered online illegally.

Your teen may be unknowingly consuming dangerous amounts of alcohol if they take part in this latest fad. Before it's too late, consider arranging an alcohol intervention. Contact Intervention Services today to learn how we can lead your loved one into recovery and help him remain sober after treatment. 

Intervention ServicesDangerous new fad: Teens “smoking” alcohol